Types of Cancer

Cancer in children is increasingly recognized as a major and growing health problem in different developed and developing countries. In Yemen, it is still difficult to know the extent of cancer and its determinants among children. This study was conducted to determine the magnitude of childhood cancer in Aden and provide the preliminary baseline data by age and sex.

Based on study conducted in 2012. Most frequent cancer among Yemeni children was leukemia 160 (33.1%) followed by lymphoma 152 (31.5%), CNS tumors 35 (7.2%) and bone tumours 25 (5.2%). An interesting and unusual finding was the frequency of acute myeloid leukemia, twice more common in females (66.7%) than males (33.3%). Lymphoma was the most common cancer in children.

The dominance of females over males is also seen with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma over Hodgkin's disease. Medulloblastoma was the most common CNS tumour followed by astrocytoma, an infrequent finding in childhood cancer. Osteosarcoma was the most frequent bone tumour. The blastoma group was common in younger age groups. Retinoblastoma and nephroblastoma predominate in females while neuroblastoma, hepatoblastoma and soft tissue sarcomas in males.
The dominance of females over males is also seen with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma over Hodgkin's disease. Medulloblastoma was the most common CNS tumour followed by astrocytoma, an infrequent finding in childhood cancer. Osteosarcoma was the most frequent bone tumour. The blastoma group was common in younger age groups. Retinoblastoma and nephroblastoma predominate in females while neuroblastoma, hepatoblastoma and soft tissue sarcomas in males.

Hope 

The future of Yemen, which is dependent on its children, is as fragile as the Yemeni children’s health. It is vital to be concerned about the ability of the current and future generations to receive adequate care. Not only do we strive to aid the physical health of these children, but also the emotional health while they undergo treatment often without their families there to support them. No one will believe little Yemen will deliver world understanding or research.
Wael hopes to gather further funding to help bridge the research gap. It would be of great benefit not only for the children of Yemen but for those around the world to understand how and why these childhood cancers are developing at an increasing rate in this country.
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Dr. Gamal Zian, president of the center - Aden
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Wael Noman, president of the CCH - USA

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